Episode 37: Hearing God about Injustice (Principles from Habakkuk in the Bible)

Episode 37: Hearing God about Injustice (Principles from Habakkuk in the Bible)

Episode Description:

Have you ever accused God of not doing something about violence or not caring about injustice? Join Gary & Jane in this latest episode of Hearing God as they share Habakkuk’s dialogue with God about injustice. They unpack principles of how to complain to God, go from worry to peace, and hear God clearly. They also share how to embrace waiting.

Episode Notes:

Background to Habakkuk:

  • Habakkuk lived in Judah around 600 BC, around the time of Jeremiah.
  • Judah was full of corruption and injustice. A place of moral decline.
  • Habakkuk’s name means ’embrace’. This book is a great example of how to ’embrace’ waiting.
  • It is a dialogue between Habakkuk and God.
  • It is also a great example of how to complain to God.

A brief summary of the whole book – 3 chapters.

  • Habakkuk’s lament Ch1:2-4. Habakkuk was one of God’s prophets, but in chapter 1, he brought a complaint to God.  He said, “When I look around, I see a lot of sin, and I feel like you need to do something about it.  But you’re not, and it just seems like you don’t care.” Have you ever asked, “How long, Lord, must I call for help, but you don’t appear to be listening?” “Why do you allow injustice? Sickness?
  • God answers. Ch1:5-11. God’s response is basically “Don’t worry – I do care and I am going to take care of it.” Before long, the Babylonians will come in and take over Judah and destroy them because of their sin. God basically says – be patient and wait.
  • Habakkuk responds to this message of judgement from God with a renewed lament. CH1:12-2:1. God’s response only confused and upset Habakkuk even more.  He said to God, “I don’t get that.  I mean, I know that Judah is bad, but you’re going to use the Babylonians?  They’re the meanest, most violent, most corrupt people on the face of this earth.  You’re going to use people like thatto destroy us?  That doesn’t seem right.  It doesn’t seem fair.”
  • God promises it will work out okay. Don’t give up. A great place to wait is in solitude 2:20 – The Lord is in His Holy Temple. Let all the earth be silent before Him.
  • Habakkuk responds with a prayer. My faith in God is not reliant on what God does or doesn’t do, what He provides or not, but that my joy relies on who God is – He is my salvation and my strength. It is a condition of my heart. I will trust God no matter what. He knows that God will give him the strength to stand and remain faithful despite …

First Principle: if you’re going to complain to God, here’s how to do it.

  • In Chapter 2, verse 1, Habakkuk teaches us how to complain.  He told God, “I will stand at my watch and station myself on the ramparts; I will look to see what he will say to me and what answer I am to give to this complaint.”
  • Even in a crisis of understanding, Habakkuk told God he would remain faithful and stand his post.
  • We can have doubts and still choose to be faithful.
  • God says – write down what I say. Journal. Take the time to write it clearly so you understand what I’m saying.
  • Are we able to say, like Habakkuk, “Even though I don’t like it, and even though I don’t understand it, and even though I know God could do something about it if he wanted to, but he doesn’t, even then, my trust is in the Lord my God.”
  • Have you thought, “That doesn’t seem very fair”.  Or maybe, like Habakkuk, there’s been a time in your life when you prayed and prayed for God to do something, to help you out with a problem, but years went by without an answer and you just gave up, thinking, “God doesn’t seem to care about anything that I’m going through.”
  • And when we’re surrounded by injustice and immorality and violence, we pray for God to do something about it.  We want to see some changes.  We pray for God to do something to make things right.

Second Principle: how to go from worry to peace.

The book of Habakkuk has ‘bookends’. It begins with Habakkuk saying, “God, I don’t understand.” Habakkuk was angry and worried. It ends with Habakkuk at peace. He had been transformed on the inside with peace.

How:

  • Remember what God has done. Remember His character, His faithfulness, His provision, His healing, His goodness. Ch 3:1-2 “Lord, I have heard of your fame; I stand in awe of your deeds, Lord. Repeat them in our day, in our time make them known; in wrath remember mercy.” I remember when… Do it again.
  • Accept what God is doing and His timing. Ch3:16 – “Yet I will wait patiently for the day of calamity to come upon the nation invading us.”
  • Trust what God is going to do. Ch 3:17-18 “Though the fig tree does not bud and there are no grapes on the vines, though the olive crop fails and the fields produce no food, though there are no sheep in the pen and no cattle in the stalls, yet I will rejoice in the Lord, I will be joyful in God my Saviour.”

Third Principle: unpacking the famous hearing God section: Habakkuk 2:1-2

“I will stand at my watch and station myself on the ramparts. I will look to see what he will say to me, and what answer I am to give to this complaint.” Then the Lord replied, “Write down the revelation and make it plain on tablets so that a herald may run with it. For the revelation awaits an appointed time.”

Principles:

  1. Position yourself.
  2. Hearing God is not a passive action but an active one to intentionally seek Him.
  3. Wait on God. Wait with God.
  4. Record.
  5. Rejoice in God even when life is not good – the barns are empty etc. Not about what God can do for you but heart relationships.

Questions:

  1. When was the last time you heard God?
  2. What do you think helps or hinders you in doing so?
  3. Where is a special place you can physically go to and hear from God?
  4. What is a Bible verse or book that you can meditate upon and soak in?
  5. What do you do while you wait – or how do you wait? Do you become impatient? How do you embrace the wait? Do you worship while you wait? Do you lean into God?

Summary:

  • First Principle: if you’re going to complain to God, here’s how to do it.
  • Second Principle: how to go from worry to peace.
  • Third Principle: unpacking the famous hearing God section: Habakkuk 2:1-2

Prophetic activation:

Turn your heart and thoughts to Father God and ask Him –

  • “Father God, what do I need to know about a particular time when I’ve felt you’ve been silent about an injustice in my life?”
  • God, is there anything else I need to know about that?”

Time Stamps:

[0:59] – Gary & Jane share briefly how they have heard God this week.

[3:44] – Background to Habakkuk

[5:01] – A brief summary of the book of Habakkuk

[7:55] – First Principle: If you’re going to complain to God, here’s how to do it.

[11:50] – Second Principle: How to go from worry to peace.

[15:15] – Third Principle – unpacking Habakkuk 2:1-2

[23:04] – Recap the principles.

[23:41] – Prophetic activation.

[24:51] – Gary & Jane both share a prophetic word for a listener.

[26:23] – Gary prays for you.

Resources / Links Mentioned:

Bible Verses Mentioned:

  • Habakkuk Chapters 1-3 (specifically Habakkuk chapter 1:2-11, 13. Chapter 2:1-2, 20. Chapter 3:1-2, 16-19
  • John 10

Connect with Gary & Jane:

Support the show:

  • Please share this podcast with someone who would value hearing from God.
  • Follow and leave a rating + review on your favourite podcast listening app.
  • If God is leading your heart to donate or support the show in any way, please visit https://buymeacoffee/garyandjanM Thank you so much.
Episode 35: Hearing God with Simon Hardaker

Episode 35: Hearing God with Simon Hardaker

Episode Description:

Join Jane as she chats with Simon Hardaker about his Christian journey and how he hears from God. Simon is a great friend of Gary & Jane, has a fantastic teaching gift, and is brilliant at hearing God for himself and others. Simon chases after God and deliberately finds ways to grow in his walk with Jesus. You will be mightily encouraged as you listen to Simon share his experiences.

Episode Notes:

Simon shares his journey of becoming a Christian and growing in Christ. He shares how he best receives intel from God. Simon unpacks the importance of being careful what we say as our words come true.

Prophetic activation:

Turn your heart and thoughts to Father God and ask Him about a particular person –

  • “Father God, what would you have me say to this person?”

Time Stamps:

[0:49] – Introduction to Simon Hardaker.

[1:54] – Jane & Simon share briefly how they have heard God this week.

[4:39] – Simon shares how he became a Christian.

[6:42] – Simon explains what a ‘Word of Faith’ church means.

[14:24] – Simon explains prophecy.

[15:39] – Simon shares how he first recognised God speaking to him.

[17:40] – Simon shares how he best receives intel from God.

[19:03] – A memorable time of receiving from God for a workmate.

[21:52] – Simon’s method of ‘pressing in’ and growing in Christ.

[23:41] – A short piece of advice for listeners.

[26:02] – Prophetic activation.

[27:39] – Jane & Simon both share a prophetic word for a listener.

[30:15] – Simon prays for you.

Resources / Links Mentioned:

Bible Verses Mentioned:

  • Ezekiel 4
  • Mark 11:35
  • Genesis 1
  • Judges 6-8 (Gideon)
  • Luke 6:45
  • Isaiah 55:11

Connect with Gary & Jane:

Support the show:

  • Please share this podcast with someone who would value hearing from God.
  • Subscribe and leave a rating + review on your favourite podcast listening app.
  • If God is leading your heart to donate or support the show in any way, please visit https://buymeacoffee/garyandjanM Thank you so much.
Episode 34: Hearing God – Hosea (Bible)

Episode 34: Hearing God – Hosea (Bible)

Episode Description:

Join Gary & Jane in this latest episode of Hearing God as they share how Hosea in the Bible heard God. They unpack how God used Hosea’s life and actions to send specific messages to the Israelites who were unfaithful to God. God asked Hosea to marry a prostitute to demonstrate this. Since Hosea’s life was a prophetic act, Gary & Jane share what prophetic acts are and how they can change outcomes. Gary & Jane also share how our name is important and brings identity and purpose.

Episode Notes:

Background to Hosea:

  • Hosea lived around 755 – 715 BC, around the time of Isaiah, Micah, and Amos. He lived in the Northern Kingdom during the reign of King Jeroboam 2.
  • Hosea is famous for obeying God’s command to him to marry a prostitute who betrayed his trust. His wife committed adultery, and the Israelites committed spiritual adultery.
  • Hosea and his wife Gomer had three children whose names even sent messages of judgment upon Israel.
  • God used Hosea’s life and actions to send specific messages to the Israelites who were unfaithful to God, who had turned their back on God, and who were worshipping other Gods.
  • You see repentance, redemption, and restoration throughout Hosea’s life and that of the Israelites.

First Principle: God can and will do anything. God is sovereign. God can also ask us to do the unimaginable.

  • Are we prepared to follow God no matter what?
  • Will we remain faithful to God no matter what?
  • Hosea 1:1 – “the word of the Lord came to Hosea.”
  • Hosea 1:2 “When the word of the Lord came to Hosea, he said to Hosea…” Hosea obeyed God. Do we obey God quickly?
  • Hosea received from God through an auditory method.
  • The first three chapters are about how Hosea lived, and the following 11 are about what he was to say to Israel.
  • When you hear from God, run it past several tests – does it align with the nature and character of God, is there Biblical precedence, and see the advice of wise, trusted people.
  • Don’t hide behind ‘God told me to”.

Second Principle: Our name is important.

  • They had three children. God said to call the eldest son Jezreel – because I will punish the house of Jehu and put an end to the Kingdom of Israel.
  • Daughter Lo-Ruhamah means ‘not loved’ because I’ll no longer show love to Israel.
  • Son – Lo Ammi, which means ‘not my people’ for you (the Israelites) are not my people, and I am not your God.
  • Our name is important. It can signify identity, purpose, and character and is often symbolic.
  • There is often a correlation between hearing God and our identity.

Third Principle: Prophetic acts can change the outcome.

  • Hosea marrying Gomer was a prophetic act. He was marrying someone, knowing she would be unfaithful, just like God with Israel.
  • A prophetic act is something done (at God’s direction) in the natural (physical) realm that supports God’s workings in the spiritual realm to bring forth results manifested in the natural realm. It somehow opens the channel for releasing God’s presence, power, and victory to affect the physical realm and change outcomes.
  • It is not a formula or method you can blindly follow to produce different results. God is not a respecter of formulas. It is also not always possible to fully explain or justify the sense behind a prophetic act with our human mind. Doing something that constitutes a prophetic act is also not worthwhile if it doesn’t first come from God.
  • It is a physical action that God gives you to do that becomes a sign and decree to forge a breakthrough in the spiritual realm. Prophetic acts are powerful visual and kinaesthetic statements to the spirit world.
  • In today’s culture, we celebrate various occasions that once began as very symbolic and prophetic, e.g. 21st birthday key symbolising the key to the door, the wedding ring symbolising eternal love.

Biblical examples of prophetic acts: The Bible has many prophetic acts. Several examples are:

  • Ezekial 4 – Lying on the left/right side, food and drink preparation, prophesying to creation.
  • 2 Kings 13:14-19 – Elisha – King Jehoash’s arrow. Get an arrow and shoot it out the window. You will now destroy the Arameans at Aphek. Elijah also commanded him to strike the ground with the rest of the arrows, but King Jehoash only struck the ground three times instead of 6.
  • Exodus 12 – Israelite families killed a lamb and put blood on their doorposts
  • John 9:1-7 – Jesus putting clay on the blind man’s eyes.
  • The action can be for intercession, warfare, healing, a call to ministry etc. It can hold the spiritual power necessary for fulfilment or breakthrough.

The main principle with prophetic acts: Ask God what the issue is and whether He wants you to do a prophetic action to facilitate change. If so, what prophetic action comes to mind? Act on it whenever you feel prompted by the Holy Spirit.

Prophetic activation:

Turn your heart and thoughts to Father God and ask Him –

  • “Father God, what are Your thoughts about my name?”
  • “Father God, what do I need to know about my name?”
  • “Father God, what nickname do You call me?”
  • You may even ask God if there is a prophetic act He would like you to do.

Time Stamps:

[0:36] – Gary & Jane share briefly how they have heard God this week.

[2:57] – Background to Hosea.

[4:21] – First Principle: God can and will do anything. God is sovereign. God can also ask us to do the unimaginable.

[7:34] – Second Principle: Our name is important.

[10:28] – Prayer for people who their name has wounded.

[12:27] – Third Principle – Prophetic acts can change the outcome.

[16:08] – Several Biblical examples of prophetic acts.

[17:12] – A significant prophetic act our family did and the outcome.

[20:46] – Recap the principles.

[21:19] – Prophetic activation.

[22:23] – Gary & Jane both share a prophetic word for a listener.

[24:27] – Gary prays for you.

Resources / Links Mentioned:

Bible Verses Mentioned:

  • Hosea 1-14
  • Ezekiel 4
  • 2 Kings 13:14-19
  • Exodus 12
  • John 9:1-7

Connect with Gary & Jane:

Support the show:

  • Please share this podcast with someone who would value hearing from God.
  • Subscribe and leave a rating + review on your favourite podcast listening app.
  • If God is leading your heart to donate or support the show in any way, please visit https://buymeacoffee/garyandjanM Thank you so much.